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anniversary of a number of civil rights flashpoints. 1963 was a pretty important year in the civil rights movement or would i will call the black freedom struggle for the rest of the talk and none will be more celebrated than the march on washington that happened on august 28, 1963. i think we can imagine that the focus will be -- this is probably what we are going to see a lot of. dr. king, the celebrity of dr. king and the i have a dream speech. maybe there will be some mentioning of the complex of the march on washington, the labor unions and the practice and made it possible and did all of the organizing. maybe we will hear about the full name of the march on washington which was the march on washington for jobs and freedom, and maybe we will even hear about the kennedy administration horror about this march. they didn't want this to happen. a were concerned there would lead to the point president kennedy's shut down the federal government other than for the essential personnel the day that this occurred in 63. but, i am pretty certain that the commemoration is mostly going to focus o
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and the demonstrated power of nonviolence and claims for participation in american citizenship and rights, why at this moment in the late 60's to the black panther party challenge america as an empire? way this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to the revolution and the black panther party? and so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we have developed in the book to give you a taste of some of it here. the first thing is that one of the things i was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is in the mid-60's there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l.a., san francisco, oakland, chicago, new york. a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains in the successes and the power of the civil rights movement and translate into that power that can challenge poverty. the civil rights movement have been tremendously successful at dismantling jim crow and d
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and really the demonstrative power of nonviolent civil disobedience and claims of participation and citizenship, why in this moment did the black panther party challenge america as empire? why did this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to revolution and the black panther party? so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we develop in the book just to give you sort of a taste of some of the pieces of the answer here. the first thing is that one of the things that was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is that in the mid '60s there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l. a.m., san francisco and oakland, chicago, new york, a real ferment, a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains and the successes and the power of the civil rights movement, and how do we translate that into the kind of power that can challenge poverty and ghettoization. the civi
fighting funding for civil rights in the united states. this should last about an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [applause] >> good evening. i am delighted, truly delighted to see all of you here this evening because this is an extraordinary evening and an extraordinary program. a little preamble, i'm at the virginia foundation for the humanities and and i'm the present of their position which produces activities and programs. [applause] thank you. i'm here to tell you that this is the coldest book festival in history. [laughter] that's a short history, 19 years nonetheless it's the coldest and it doesn't appear to be getting better tomorrow or the next day either. very unusual but spring is again at 7:02 on wednesday. i'm sure none of you noticed along the way. we began that morning with the nineteentnineteent h annual virginia festival of books. next year we want you wanted to come back to the 20th which will begin on march the 19th and run it until the 23rd so we are moving back a day. we expect it to be warmer non
his civil rights movement to a human rights movement. meaningful equality was not to be achieved through civil rights alone without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise, so in honor of dr. king and all of those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we'll commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration, a movement of education, not inv. cation, a movement for jobs, not jails, a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights to work, to shelter, to food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? well, first i believe we got to begin by telling the truth, the whole truth, and admit out loud that we as a nation created a cap-like system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the truth in the schools, in our churches, in our places of worship, behind bars, and in reentry centers. we've got to be willing to tell this truth so that a great a
by recalling lifelong support the civil rights movement also opined the brief was legally correct. jay stanley pottinger the assistant attorney general for civil rights argued strenuously against filing. he made three points. the brief is incoherent. no one could tell that the go standard it can change. two, the brief was profoundly misguided would damage the list for schoolchildren. there is no need to file the brief because the civil rights division are to have implement tenet standard for more than a decade. he did not notice only one of these three initially and consistent points could be right. though all three might be wrong. at the end of the meeting, my recommendation was not to file. i'd written a brief and i acquitted myself, but i can't know conker should be given to the violent. solicitor general bork also recommended not filing. that cost him a lot. he knew this would be his last chance for influence in a subject you care deeply about. but if that discouraging defiance was more important and attorney general bv agreed to solicitor general bork. this one in my hand may be the only
during the civil rights movement. at 10:00 p.m. eastern, our weekly "after words" program. david bernstein sits down with a a special guest. he concludes nights programming at 11:00 p.m. eastern with sandra day o'connor in her book out of order. stories from the history of the supreme court. as a booktv.org for more information on this weekend television schedule. >> you are watching booktv on c-span2. coming up next, fiona deans hallora recounts the life of thomas nast. a regular contributor to harvard weekly, he made the donkey and the elephant the symbols of the the political parties in our country. this is about 40 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good evening. welcome to the historical society. i want to thank you for joining us tonight. what i know will be a very interesting program. "thomas nast." he is the father of political cartoons. i want to thank you for being here. this is the first time in a while that we have had the ability to start an evening program. i appreciate you coming in and bring with us. our mission is to preserve and tell the history and culture.
that if we did we would be treated okayed liked that and wanted to be a civil rights lawyer that that's what i wanted to do from the time i was 6-years-old, i'm sorry, the sixth grade. and i knew i was going to law school and by the time i went, i got interested in criminal law. before that i never thought of, wall and my professor made of the class interesting and i thought of pursuing that and i ended up that wasn't so much later on a think that the work of public defenders we are fighting some civil rights of our clients and given the disparity of the criminal-justice system, the racial disparity. i went to harvard law school and howard university undergrad. you have a very famous name. a few times i've gotten invitations from cuba but she is an incredible wollman myett meijer triet >> host: you met her? >> guest: i've never met her. i want to meet her. i get a lot of e-mails and that kind of communication with her. she now is doing a lot of important work on the present industrial contact creates more confusion >> host: we have been talking with defense the power of the american prosecut
of all colors. in 1968, dr. king told now is the time to come from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. meaningful equality he said could not be achieved through civil rights alone. without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise. so in honor of dr. king, and all those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to and mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a movement for jobs, not jail. a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights, to work, to shelter, and the food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? first i believe we've got to begin by telling the truth. the whole truth. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a caste like system in this country. we've got to be willing to tell the truth in our schools, in our churches and o
nixon and eisenhower it was a civil rights party of lincoln and the the democrats -- >> jackie robinson. >> and martin luther king was a big supporter until they had a bad moment when nixon didn't come to his aid. nixon was working in the senate and lobbied for a stronger version of the 1967 bill that was a landmark bill at the time, so they were very different parties and the leaders of the party there was a liberal and conservative wing so to speak, the conservative wing, people like robert taft, he was an isolationist but he supported the pensions. he had a real social conscience and so on. there were out fliers to the trustees six out fliers in the country and there was senator mccarthy but they were out fliers to be dated and speak with authority, and in fact even though eisenhower was reluctant to take anybody on directly, she felt he did want to get mccarthy from the party that put next-gen up to it. >> one of the challenges for someone writing about richard nixon i think, i would like to know if you share this view, that we have an ocean of information about him as president lar
. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement which they played a leading role in pushing out forward and ending the war in vietnam and changing the way we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create up star movements. i think all that was incredibly important and the beginning of the women's movement all that great activism that it produced and all of that we are seeing that directly play out today whether it's the election of barack obama or the continued advancement of women in congress so all that is a direct result of their activism. that being said there is a lot of work left undone and i think that we now spend three fourths of our entitlement money on people who are over the age of 30 and it used to be we spent three for some people under the age of 30 in terms of the amount of money and investment. it's not in terms of generational warfare but i think we need to have a conversation about how we are dividing our priorities. this is not
. in 1968, dr. king told advocates the time had come to transition from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. many photo-quality could not be achieved through civil rights allowed without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to quality education. civil rights are empty promise. in honor of dr. king and all those who labor to win the election crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a group that for jobs, not jails. is limited and we limited analytical discrimination against people. discrimination that denies basic human rights to work, shelter and two food. what a sweet deal? first we've got to begin by telling the church, the wiltshire. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a catholic system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the center places of worship, behind artist and inventor center. we got to be willing to tell the truth so great awakening to the reality of what has occurred can c
's civil rights division as his mom knee to head the labor d., and we will carry that announcement live at about 11:40 eastern this morning here on c-span2. also at 12:30, remarks from michigan senator carl levin. he'll be speaking at the council on foreign relations on u.s. defense policy issues. life coverage begins at 12:30 eastern again here on c-span2. and the u.s. house and senate return today to consider continuing funding for the federal government past march 27th when current funding expires. they're also expected to work on their respective budget plans for fiscal year 204. the house back at 2 p.m. for legislative business. floor debate likely while members wait for the senate to ask. also the senate in at 3 p.m. --2 p.m. eastern. and then hoping to move on to the 2014 budget resolution, and they hope to get it approved before by the end of the week before the easter recess. life coverage of the house, as usual, on c-span and, of course, the senate right here on c-span2. ..2 last week endorsed a review of military roles to allow seniors to manage overturns sexual assault victi
is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement, which they played a leading role in pushing that forward, and ending the war in vietnam, and changing the wail we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create upstart movements. think all that was incredibly important. the beginning of the women's movement, all that great activism they produced, and that -- all of that, we're seeing that play out today. whether it's the election of barack barack obama or continued advancement of women in congress. there's a lot of work left undone, and i think that there's -- we now spend 3/4 of our entitlement money on people who are over the age of 30. used to be we spent 3/4 on people under the age of 30. it's not a question of generational warfare, but i think we need to have a conversation about how we're dividing our priorities. this is not a generation that expects to get those entitlements. my general has any belief the government is going to give them that money -- >> host
the civil rights movement. at 10 p.m. eastern we'll bring you our weekly "after words" program. this week david burstein, author of "fast future" sits down with host s.e. cupp. and we conclude tonight's prime time programming at 11 eastern with sandra day o'connor. her book is "out of order." visit booktv.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. >> here's a look at some books that are being published this week. bioethicist ezekiel emanuel recounts his upprescriptioning and how his immigrant parents produced three successful children including his brother rahm emanuel and ari emanuel, a hollywood agent, in "brothers emanuel." in "those angry days: roose svelte, lindbergh and america's fight over world war ii, lynne olson recounts world war ii. jeff chu presents his thoughts on religion and gay rights in "does jesus really love me: a gay christian's pilgrimage in search of god in america." in "forecast: what physics, meetology and science can teach us," mark buchanan explains how the ebb and flow of markets and the economy can relate to numerous fields of science. look for these
're meddling. if we stay back, they say why aren't you standing up for civil rights. >> guest: absolutely. and i think that is the fate of a superpower, right? it is a catch 22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver for others. so it's all about your own, your own interests. and, um, i do quote the this official who say we're kind of damned if we do, damned if we don't. and, you know, the pendulum swings constantly. it's a cyclical thing. look at syria now. people are very, very upset in syria and in the region to some extent and here in the u.s. you listen to senator john mccain, very upset that the u.s. isn't intervening, isn't doing something. there was, you know, perhaps as much upset when the u.s. decided to go to war in iraq. now there's upset because of inaction, and, you know, under the bush administration there was upset because of action. so it's a struggle to find that fine line. >> host: i think it's break time. [laughter] >> guest: great. >> on the go? "after words" is available via podcast. visit booktv.org
of the brave. they discuss their personal experiences during the civil rights movement. live from the virginia festival of the book. tonight at 8:00 eastern. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. >>> up next on booktv physician and science writer talking about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. he argues that pharmaceutical companies hide negative studies and use expensive lobbying to get what they want. the event from seattle's town hall lasts about ninety minutes. [applause] thank you. app fair dislow sure. i'm hoping it's aer in i did nerdy crowd -- [cheering and applause] you are my people. [laughter] there's no reader's health advice here. i'm not going tell you how to get the best out of the doctor. there are no idle conspiracy theories how drug companies are trying to kill us. it's a story about flaws in how we dwat gather evidence in medicine. i think the technical flaws in important technical process very well documented in the medical academic professional literature what i'm hope dog is share that more broadly with the public. in particular because there's several very
their personal experiences during the civil rights movement. live from the virginia test festival of the book tonight at k58 eastern. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. >>> here's a look at books being published this week. and youngest siblings a hollywood agent in "brothers emanuel "a memoir of an american family. in the angry days roosevelt, lindberg, and america's fight over world war ii recounting the political battle between american isolationist and interventionist during world war ii. jeff chu articles editor for fast company magazine present the thoughts on religious and gay rights.
historic civil rights legislation the income tax cut in just six weeks after the assassination of president kennedy mix to 80 dead and threatened and praised and did what a hands-on leader does and his hands were huge and the stories about johnson grabbing people by the shoulder and just getting right in their grill to make them realize a one part and it was. how about my dad and the managing of the fall of the iron curtain as the soviet empire was collapsing there were significant dangers that there would be violence of epic proportions to be the the united states could have justifiably done a victory dance over the soviets, particularly for example when the berlin wall fell. i will never forget watching my dad on tv and critics, the pundits were saying he should go over there and celebrate with the german people. had my dad done with the people of this year and now wanted to do rather than being a leader would have created greater fall more abilities for gorbachev to create an orderly transfer without will blood shed. amazingly so. a dictatorship of epic proportions in the 20th century fe
-- is keeping the draft some of the civil-rights movement and people were briefly joining martin mr. king was assassinated april of 68 and just after i graduated kennedy was assassinated that had a huge impact on me. instead as the good quality of law in london if you could write fast and giveback accurately you did well but in a harvard they would change the goalpost and that was interesting because it encouraged sinking but most of all but struck me which was so different from the ireland i have left was young people making a difference favor deciding we could make a change and use things and we are going to bring on our own perspective so i came back to ireland in 1968 to practice and teach lot and as mine has been to be said i was in view was something he recognized as harvard humility. that led me the following year to question why it was those who were traditionally elected to the six universities scenes with elderly male professors, why was that? my friend said if you do want to go forward we will campaign with you. i was elected to the senate at the age of 25 that means i was prac
to prosecutors. including the right to a fair and impartial trial. second, open the civil courts to military victims. civilian victims including dod employees, have one critical avenue that is currently unavailable to uniforms personnel and access to civil court. to this day, u.s. supreme court and the federal court below it continued to maintain that service members are barred from negligence or intentional discrimination against the military. depriving it for violations of their rights. congress must ensure that men and women in uniform can access the remedies available for all other individuals under the civil rights act. those who report incidents of absence, the absence of these remedies is especially shameful. today we are looking at an institution that desperately needs to be shown the steps forward. senators do not need to begin survivors. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. >> thank you for having me here. i have deep gratitude towards those who have worked tirelessly for our voices to be heard and those listening with compassionate and open hearts to make positive ch
and there was a time civil-rights, universal rights was the providence of federal government and local government got in the way as we all know in the 60s federal troops escorted african-americans into state and local universities in the south because mayors of places like little rock were a big part of the problem but nowadays that has changed in fundamental ways and i know longer see the central government as a friend of progress toward justice and for real opponent of big money. i see cities as better able to do that and it seems to me big money thinks big government is really the place it wants to operate. the reason big money isn't on the side of the tea party ultimately is they don't need to make big government smaller. they can buy it and own it and put it to their own uses and that is harder to do nowadays in the city's. a quick word. mayor bloomberg, a lot of mayors about whom we can argue, talked about some of the things we have problems, i had problems with bloomberg's change of the city constitution taking a third term and had problems with the weight he brought people into the school sys
civil rights legislation in 1964 was 101 years. it didn't happen overnight, and so i think it's going take a while. but, as has been said, "a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." i see the steps are beginning. >> god is mentioned a lot in your book. >> i think we've made a real mistake here in not realizing-- we spoke of history a moment ago-- that great men and women of our past, creative people, political people, all had a familiarity with scripture, with the ten commandments, the sermon on the mount, the golden rule, the way life works. now i'm not calling upon everybody to embrace my church or my beliefs, but i am saying that there are certain truths. ted koppel said some years ago in a remarkable speech at duke university on the ten commandments, "the truth is not a polite tap on the shoulder, it's a howling reproach." and he also said we've actually convinced ourselves that slogans will save us: "shoot up if you must, but use a clean needle." "enjoy sex whenever and with whomever you wish, but wear a condom." and then he said no, the answer is no; not no beca
it in an expedited way subject to rule, protections for privacy, civil rights and civil liberties that people the right to expect? we are making progress on all those fronts in addition to what cathy has said. >> i know my time is over expired so thank you, mr. chairman spent thank you very much. thanks for being here again. senator baldwin, welcome. great to see. please proceed spent i also want to thank the chairman and ranking member for holding this up and down review of the department of homeland security. clearly what was accomplished back in 2003 was no easy task, and i certainly recognize the incredible progress made in the 10 years since the departments creation. but since we're here today i want to focus in on a couple of the areas in which the department can improve or have been pointed out. fortunately, for me, senator ayotte's last question was the first question i was going to ask about in terms of the recommendations in the gao high-risk report on implementing sharing across agency so if you like you tackle that. but i also want to look at another area. mr. dodaro, and your tes
, but marriage is not a religious right. it's a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not have a right to marry someone except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage licenses. the government decidings who gets married and who doesn't. so in 1967, there was a supreme court case loving v. virginia and blacks continue marry whites. they challenged that and the supreme court ruled that 9-0. it was -- they have ruled now fourteen times about the fundamental right to marriage. from the legal substantiate -- standpoint there's no argument. you can a make a moral standpoint. from a legal substantiate -- standpoint. how broadly they will rule, that we don't know. >> the nation's highest court hears highest arguments challenging proposition 8 the constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. c-span and c-span radio will have live coverage beginning at 1:00 p.m. eastern. the reaction will play tomorrow night on c-span2. wednesday they hear arguments over the constitutionality of defense of marriage act. c-span and c-span radio will again have cove
department's civil rights division, we have pathways into the workforce for everyone willing to contribute including lg bt americans and immigrants. and he has helped settle some of the largest cases ever of those targeted by unfair mortgage lending. tom has also spent a career as a consensus builder. has worked with ceos and labor leaders and federal and state and local government levels. and throughout he understands that our economy works best when the middle class and those working to get into the middle class have the security that they need on the job. a democratic voice in the workplace. everybody playing by the same set of rules. his knowledge and experience will make him an outstanding secretary of labor. there is plenty of work to do. we will have to work very hard to make sure that folks find jobs with wages and benefits. we have to make sure that our veterans are returning home from iraq and afghanistan and they have a chance to put their incredible skills and leadership to work. we need to build immigration system that works for every employee and every family and every busine
extends the protections of federal civil rights law to the health care system for the first time. those protections include the ada, americans with disabilities act which was protections on the basis of hiv or aids steps to it also at the bottom includes title ix which has protections on the basis of sex. following the lead of equal employment opportunity equal employment opportunity commission, last year the department health and human services released guidance saying that they also interpret the sex protections of section 1557 to include gender identity and sex stereotyping. insurance market reforms, as neera mention an major combat of the affordable care act. many of the new protections in the insurance market are very important for marginalized consumers such as lgbt individuals. the patient's bill of rights for example, includes important protections for transgender people come for people with expensive conditions such as hiv or cancer. it phases out limits on coverage that were particularly problematic for people with expensive conditions. it ends presenting condition exclusions
care act extends the protection of federal civil rights laws to the health care system for the first time. those protections include the ada american with disabilities act, it also there includes tight ix which has intersections on the basis of sex. following the lead of equal employment opportunity last year. the department of health and human services released guidance say they interpret the section protection to include gender identity and sex stereo typing. insurance market reform as she mentioned a major component of the affordable care act. many of the new protections are very important for marginnized consumers. the patient's bill of rights, for example, -- people with expensive conditions such as hiv or cancer. it phases out limits on coverage that are problematic with conditions. .. the affordable care act puts its money where its mouth is about prevention and wellness. it creates $15 billion prevention of public health found, which supports new initiative that could transformation grants program and make certain preventive services free including services particularly impor
to rules, protection for civil rights and civil liberties in the practice on although some. >> i know my time is over. thank you for the latitude of mr. chairman. >> senator baldwin, good to see you. >> i want to also thank the chairman and ranking member for holding this iconography of the department of homeland security. clearly what was accomplished in 2003 was no easy task and i certainly recognize the incredible progress made is the department's creation. since were here today, i want to focus on a cup o. areas in which the department can improve. fortunately for me, senator ayotte's last question is the first question i was going to ask about in terms of recommendations in the gao high-risk report on sharing across agencies. i feel like you've tackled that. i want to also look at another area. mr. dodaro, in your testimony you discuss the high-risk and 2013 limiting the fiscal exposure by better managing in the changer is. our country has certainly seen an increase in events that contributed to significant loss of life and property. they are more and more damaging than the level of
working closely with more of the civil rights organizations that have sued. this particular case is, actually, it has been brought by native american tribes, and the reason for that, arizona once again being an outlier in the name supposedly of trying to deny undocumented immigrants from registering to vote which is a nonissue because most undocumented immigrants would not dare to vote. they're afraid to even call the police for a crime. what's happened since 2004 when this law went into effect, over 30,000 citizens have been denied the ability to register to vote or to show when they were at the polls were not allowed to vote. so that is what the lawsuit is about. it's whether the state of arizona can have different requirements than the national voter registration act. >> host: an important issue for illegal immigrants. we actually want to hear from them today, this morning during this segment. if you're an illegal immigrant and you want to call in and give your comments or thoughts on this subject, call us at 202 -- a special line, 585-3883. we can talk about the supreme court de
is not a religious right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not have a right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage licenses. the government decides who gets married in two dozen. so in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving v. virginia, and blacks couldn't marry whites. they challenged that and the supreme court ruled that nine nothing. it was, they have ruled now 14 times about the fundamental right to marriage. from a legal standpoint there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint there is no argument. so we feel confident that i'm an outcome how broadly the supreme court will rule? that we don't know. >> tomorrow the nation's highest court hears oral arguments challenging california's proposition eight, a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage in that state. c-span and c-span radio will have live coverage beginning at 1 p.m. eastern. the arguments along with reaction will play again on c-span tomorrow night at 8 p.m. eastern. on wednesday th
on states trying to do their job, trying do things properly, has been made by the head of the civil rights division at justice, thomas perez, who is now nominated for labor secretary. this amendment and this proposal would clarify it by actually requiring photo i.d.'s for voting in federal elections. we require photo i.d.'s for traveling at airports. we require photo i.d.'s for going into a conditions. we require photo i.d.'s for a myriad of things, including visiting the white house. surely, it's a very legitimate, simple requirement that doesn't disenfranchise anyone to make sure the integrity of our election system is preserved. and i urge my colleagues to support this amendment. third, madam president, another amendment i will bring would finally require the u.s. visit system to be properly and fully executed and put in place. the u.s. visit system, as you know, madam president, is an entry-and-exit control system to track foreign nationals who are properly visiting our country with visas. a understanand so it tracks they come in, tracks them as they go out. and so if they oversay that
you often have to do it repeatedly and through outrageous conduct and someone could sue you in civil court. there is an aerial surveillance case involving trade secrets that came out in favor of the plaintiff. >> could someone by one right now? >> you could go -- >> get a certification from the at a a? >> i don't know if this is put limits to call a drone but for $300, something, an aerial vehicle you could control with your i've had and fly around your neighborhood and likely you are not going to be running against -- not going to get sued in all likelihood. the faa bans commercial use of jerome today but that ban is said to be relaxed in 2015 and of course have an economic incentive. in my personal view to the extent you are interested this is a wonderful thing because this technology is deeply transformative and basically flying smart phones. once of private industry get their hand on these things we will see some great wonders but we will never get there unless we place some limits and privacy because of our reaction to these drones we are not going to avail ourselves of the tech
, although you often have to do it repeatedly someone could see you in civil court. there's a surveillance case that came out in favor of the plaintiff. >> so someone could buy one right now? >> you have to get certification from the faa? >> not really. i don't know if this stretches the limits, but you could buy an air for $300. it's the vehicle you can control and flight around your neighborhood within line of sight and likely you're not going to be running -- you're not going to get sued in all likelihood. the faa has banned the commercial use today, but that effect to be relaxed in 2015 and of course we have an economic incentive. my own personal view, i think this is a wonderful thing because this is deeply transformative and i basically find smartphones. once private industry gets their hands, we'll see really great wonders. however one never get airbus to place limits because of our reactions. were not going to avail ourselves to technology. >> stepanovich, by the way i have a hard lesson income as they relate to you. how would you respond to that in terms of the issues in private c
kill off civilization or send us into the dark ages but maybe only destroyed new york city. and of those asteroids, we know well less than 1% of those. so right now the metaphor in time that we're likely to get from one of those is zero. >> and let me ask a final question. what is our capacity if we discovered a sizable what that was on a collision course? what is our capacity right now to do something to change that? >> if you find it early, decades in advance, which is what the goal of mass is to do, and the goal is to be -- we have many options. then you only need to change the trajectory by very, very tiny amount. senator nelson, you know from having flown in space that when you're many orbits ahead of time, very tiny changes in your speed make big differences in the timing of where you are many orbits later and that's exactly what you do. so in real terms, if you change an asteroids speed of something like one millimeter per second, that's about the speed that in and walks. and to do that 10 years or more, before squinting at the earth, you can make it miss the earth.
in the sub rights division since 2000 currently serves as the assistant attorney general for civil rights. he is the sum of a dominican immigrant in the first hispanic to be named to president obama second term cabinet. the ceremony to case in the white house geese room this morning. here is a look. [background sounds] >> ladies and gentlemen the president of the united states accompanied by thomas perez. [applause] [applause] >> thank you. [applause] everybody have a seat. have a seat. as i have set before my top priority as president is doing everything we need to do to make sure that we are growing our economy and that we are strengthening our middle class. and as i said said in my state of the union address last month, every day we should be asking ourselves three questions. one, how do we make sure america is a magnet for good jobs? number two how do we equip people with the skills they need to get those jobs and number three, how do we make sure that hard work actually pays off with a decent living. these are the challenges that i've instructed my team at the white house and by entire c
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